When it comes to hair color for black women sometimes you might have to experiment with different color ideas to find the right shade for you. Whether you want completely new look or just want to add some spark to your current color, there are fashionable and beautiful options. Here are Some trendiest hair color for black women: Dirty Blonde Hair Color What makes dirty blonde a desirable hair dye color for black women is …

4 Things Everyone Ought to Know About Hair Color For Black Women

When it comes to hair color for black women sometimes you might have to experiment with different color ideas to find the right shade for you. Whether you want completely new look or just want to add some spark to your current color, there are fashionable and beautiful options.

Here are Some trendiest hair color for black women:

Dirty Blonde Hair Color

What makes dirty blonde a desirable hair dye color for black women is that it complements your dark complexion perfectly creating a well-balanced look.

Platinum Blonde Hair Color

Platinum blonde is light but trendy. Blonde hair contracts With darker skin giving you an incredible and beautiful look.

Red Hair Color

A subtle dark red  is flashy and gorgeous. All you need is just the right amount to make it pop. To create a modern and chic look try fiery red.

Dark Ombre Hair Color

Want to try something new? Go for a beautiful dark ombre hair color. To spice things up, dye your hair roots  a dark brown shade finish it up with a lighter brown or dark blonde tips.

Rich Dark Chocolate Brown Hair Color

Dark chocolate-brown is a more natural-looking hair color. It has an added texture that makes it interesting and delicate.

But just before you decide to alter the color of your hair there are four things you need to consider. Hair Porosity, Texture, your hair natural color, and damages.

While you might not necessary have control over all of them, you must understand them to get a beautiful hair dye color. They play an important role in what type of chemical you can use and how long it will take to process chemical treatment.

This video by Mo Knows Hair takes you through all the four important things to consider before dyeing your hair and how to do a Demi-permanent Dye application.

Hair porosity:

Hair porosity is how easy it is for your hair to absorb and hold moisture. It  also decide how color deposits in your hair. Low porous hair can be difficult to dye since it doesn’t absorb easily. This is doubled when your hair is coarse.

While low porous hair may not react to humidity easily, it has resistant to chemical processing — requiring higher strength chemical and longer  processing time.

If you have low porous hair it can be difficult to process hair dye because the hair shaft is not so receptive to foreign chemicals.

This means if you are using a box kit you may not get color result as you see on the packaging. You might need to use more product to prevent it drying out or the ammonia evaporating. Cover with a shower cap to keep the liquid and heat.

In contrast, with high porous hair you need to be careful not to over process your hair as chemicals can process twice as fast.

Hair Texture:

Coarse strands take more time to absorb color than fine width strands. This means that processing times varies from instructions given in kits.

According to hairfinder.com “Most haircolor packaging – especially those found in haircolor kits in supermarkets and drugstores – are designed to color a head of hair that is of average density, average texture and around-or-less-than shoulder length.

This means that when the texture and density are greater than average you may need more product to deal with the amount of hair you have’.

It adds,  “The instructions for applying hair color are generally designed for hair that is of average density and texture. Coarse hair may require a longer processing time because it typically has a stronger structure and can often be resistant (which indicates low porosity, a measure of the ease with which the hair absorbs moisture).

Conversely, fine hair must be monitored carefully when coloring – particularly when lightening the hair – since it tends to process faster and could be damaged by lightening processes if you leave it too long”.

Hair Density

Density affects hair color as well, as hair that is very dense may tend to process faster near the scalp than at the ends, since the denseness of the hair can hold in the heat of the head, speeding up color processing and lightening especially.

In cases of very dense hair, it may be necessary to apply the color to the hair at least a half-inch from the scalp first, then after ten minutes apply the color to the scalp area and work the color through the ends.

If you’re dealing with hair that has noticeably different texture and density in differing areas of the head, then you probably want to apply your color to the coarsest or densest areas first, and then apply color to the less coarse or dense areas after giving those areas a head start on processing.

Even in these situations, be sure to carefully watch the less dense, and finer textured areas of the hair to make sure the processing doesn’t result in damage.

Your Natural Hair Color:

There are levels to this if you have level 1 or 2 black or very brown hair you might not make it to those bright blondes or bright reds colors without  the use of permanent dye high level developer and in some cases bleaching agents.

Your hair’s starting shade and the strength of the product play a very important part in the result. For example,warm tints, like reds, golds, and coppers, will show up less in black and very dark brown hair. Whether your hair is fine or coarse,  if you have very dark hair and want a reddish result consider a permanent hair dye with a low-level of peroxide.

Hair Damage:

After color application, you may experience differences in curl pattern, elasticity and overall manageability.

This will vary from person to person. A good barometer is to think of your hair history if you are prone to excessive shedding, dryness and breakage without color, expect those issues to get even worse with color.

When possible, do a roots-only application rather than an all over application. Applying more color to the previously colored sections might cause more damage to your hair.

After applying color to just the roots, follow with a “Shine & Rinse” emulsion step to brighten the previously colored section without overexposing it to color.

Use a demi-permanent color application on your hair because it will be less damaging. “Once the damaged hair has grown out, you can move to a permanent application,

There are always adverse effects to permanent dying, it damages the protein structure and the protective fatty surface layer, makes hair more porous. You might be happy with the last one! Be sure to use ingredients like coconut oil, ceramides, 18-MEA and panthenol to protect from and patch and repair the damages.

What has been your hair color experience? Leave us a comment below.

4 Things Everyone Ought to Know About Hair Color For Black Women